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New Jersey did the right thing a year and a half ago for the state’s college athletes, passing a law that will allow them to profit off their name, likeness and image, and it did this long before most other states tackled the issue. State legislators accomplished this through a smart, proactive and long overdue law called the New Jersey Fair Play Act. The law, which forbids a university like ...

BLOOMINGTON - Late last month, flanked by Ohio State Athletic Director Gene Smith, Ohio state Senator Niraj Antani announced the introduction of a state-level bill meant to legalize the ability for college athletes to profit off their name, image and likeness (NIL). "As a graduate of the Ohio State University," Antani said, standing at an Ohio State-branded lectern, "I saw how hard ...

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LOS ANGELES, June 10, 2021 /PRNewswire/ -- For the first time in NCAA history, NCAA student-athletes will be able to monetize their name, image, and likenesses. To support these student-athletes in the NIL era, INFLCR, the top athlete brand-building and compliance platform for collegiate and professional organizations, and Influential, the world's largest influencer marketing company, which provides social media insights and brand connections through its AI-powered Social Intelligence™ platform, announced a partnership today. This unprecedented alliance will help student-athletes navigate the new NIL legislation and brand partnership opportunities, while remaining compliant with current and anticipated state, federal, and NCAA rules.

WASHINGTON — Congress loves deadlines, and on Wednesday senators on the Commerce Committee were told they effectively have three weeks to figure out what to do about setting rules for how college athletes may be compensated for use of their name, image and likeness. That’s because a Florida state law takes effect July 1, the first of a cascade of policies in at least 19 states that sets the ...

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HARTFORD, Conn. — A Connecticut bill that would allow the state’s college athletes to be compensated for the use of their name, image and likeness, earn money for endorsements and hire a sports attorney, has passed both the Connecticut House of Representatives and the Senate and now awaits Gov. Ned Lamont’s signature to become law. “This bill really addresses an issue of basic fairness,” said ...