As most people know, on January 21 more than five million women worldwide marched in protest of Donald Trump’s inauguration and the policies he vowed to put in place in lieu of former President Obama’s.

It has been three full days and here is what Trump has accomplished:

  • Issued an executive order in an attempt to repeal Obamacare.
  • Halted a reduction to annual mortgage insurance costs.
  • Issued executive orders to withdrawal from the Trans-Pacific Partnership
  • Threatened to defund foreign aid for places that provide abortions or information about abortions.

Let’s discuss why the women and men who marched did so and how Trump did exactly what they expected him to do.

Trump and the Republicans that back him do not have a plan to replace Obamacare. They want to repeal the act and leave millions uninsured for months.

Men, women, and children who were not lucky enough to receive a “small loan of one million dollars” or a job that gives them proper insurance will face illness and injury with no way to afford a trip to their family doctor or local hospital. They will be faced with a decision: get help and go into more debt or suffer.

For those with the radical notion that Americans should allow their people the right to live without the fear of dying due to curable disease, I’m sorry that in his first 72 hours holding office, President Trump has failed you.

Let’s not forget that Trump stated that he, “want[ed] to lower taxes for the middle class,” yet in his first few days in office, he decided to halt a reduction in mortgage premiums.

Although mortgage insurance may not seem like it is that much, to the family that ends the week with less than $50 to their name, it is. President Trump is not a friend of the middle class. He will not defend it. He is the very epitome of a man who is causing the middle class to be “murdered,” as he described it.

Now, let’s talk about the Trans-Pacific Partnership. I will not pretend that I understand the trade deal entirely because I don’t. What I do know is that this partnership and the countries involved represented 40 percent of the world’s economic output.

Slashing tariffs between countries the United States trades with often makes sense, doesn’t it? It gives incentive for countries to trade with us. However, this partnership did not include China, and for some reason Trump cares a great deal on not letting China feel left out. This may or may not work out in the United States favor, though.

The action that Trump has taken that cannot and will not bode well for women around the world is his reinstatement of the rule that any business that provides abortions or informations about abortions will lose U.S. funding. In countries where women’s health is already something that is largely ignored, women will have to deal with a lack of information on their body because a small section of their society requires an abortion.

I will not go into another rant about how abortion is not murder and argue that those who call pro-choicers “pro-abortion” are actually religious fascists who value the concept of life more so than a life itself. Instead, I will say this.

Abortions do not happen as often as pro-lifers care to believe. Women getting sick and dealing with problems directly related to their womanhood do.

I wanted to give Trump a chance. I tried to give him a chance, but in his first few days, he’s let his nation down.

That’s why these people are protesting. This nation was built on protesters, so to those who call the men and women marching “cry-babies,” they aren’t cry-babies. They aren’t feminazis or extremists.

They’re patriots, fighting for what they believe.

Have you ever watched a show that made you question the choices you’ve made in your life? If you haven’t, Black Mirror will make you feel that way. It’s a Netflix original series and was first released in 2014 and currently has three seasons. Each episode focuses on various people’s lives in near-future, semi-dystopian societies and how technology affects them and the world around them.

When I first started watching Black Mirror, I thought it was just about how the usage of technology corrupts people and is changing the world for the worst. However, as I continued watching the show, I noticed the social commentary. Each episode explains how technology affects the person the storyline is about, but it also opens a discussion about how society acts towards certain people.

For example, one of the episodes focuses on a woman living in a world where ratings matter. She has an app that is similar to the social media sites we have today, and she gives a rating of one to five stars to each person she encounters and vice versa. The higher your rating is, the more you’re able to purchase things – i.e. she is trying to purchase a house and must have a 4.5 out of 5 rating – and the more “friends” you gain.

One misstep, though, can cause your rating to suffer and you can lose everything. Without spoiling too much, this episode is a clear example of the society we are heading into now. Many of us care about how people perceive us that we end up pretending to be someone we’re not just to flourish in attention.

As previously mentioned, each episode showcases a new character and how their decisions affect the world around them. Each episode can be applied to our reality. The characters make us wonder, at least this is what happened to me, if we would do the same thing he or she did if we were placed in the same situation.

Regardless of the fact we don’t have the technology the show provides, the characters are still human with similar emotions and thought process as the viewers. Watching one episode will truly make you wonder if our society is heading towards the same ones shown on the screen. It’ll also make you rethink how you use technology, from what you share to who you interact with.

You will more than likely cycle through your emotions while watching each episode and may end up caring about the characters you see on the screen until you find out why they are in that situation. I highly suggest you give Black Mirror a chance.

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