This year’s Dance Theatre, running April 10-13, consists of a variety of themes, such as depression, the difficulty of change and the caffeinated daily roller coaster of excessive energy and exhaustion. Photo by Bethany Perry

This year’s Dance Theatre, running April 10-13, consists of a variety of themes, such as depression, the difficulty of change and the caffeinated daily roller coaster of excessive energy and exhaustion.
Photo by Bethany Perry

BY: WESTLEY METCALFE
progress@eku.edu

Since 1950, the EKU Dance Theatre has consistently amazed Eastern students and the Richmond community with its extravagant dance concerts held biannually. The EKU Dance Theatre looks to continue this praise with the anticipation of their best performance yet April 10-13.

Directed by Marianne McAdam, the director of the EKU Dance Theatre, the show will consist of a variety of themes, such as depression, the difficulty of change and the caffeinated roller coaster of excessive energy and exhaustion we live with each day. Overall, the main theme is struggle, which represents the average student’s life throughout the college years.

The concert this semester is made up of 27 dancers. Most of the dancers are not dance majors, but rather students from various disciplines.

“Dance Theatre was one of the things that really interested me at EKU,” said Cortlyn Todd, a junior athletic training major and president of the Dance Theatre. “It’s not just a cheerleading dance team. It’s very much about the art of dance.”

Auditions are held at the beginning of each semester where Dance Theater officers choose choreographers for the show. Once they are chosen, auditions are held for the semester’s concert. The dancers are selected by the choreographers depending on which ones seem like the best fit for each particular piece. For a majority of the pieces, the students are the choreographers, but they work closely with Marianne McAdam who guides them along throughout the semester.

“It’s an art and in art you want to express yourself. It just so happens that in dance they express themselves through movement,” McAdam said. “Once the students find modern dance and find out how much of a joy it is to have that outlet for expression, that’s what drives them to want to create pieces.”

The underlying theme of the concert is “struggle,” such as Naomi Day’s solo piece on depression and Cortlyn Todd’s piece on the difficulty of change.

The show will also contain pieces with a more upbeat and lighter side. One such piece is a clogging composition created by senior Whitney Brockman. Brockman’s piece has a humorous theme that was inspired by the movie “Mean Girls.”

“I love being apart of Dance Theatre,” Brockman said. “We all work so hard all semester long and it’s amazing to see all of our hard work pay off. I’ve made lifelong friends in Dance Theatre and it’s so fun to be able to dance together.”

Another piece with an optimistic theme is one created by Mio Sasaki, a visiting student from Yamanashi University in Japan. According to McAdam, this piece by Sasaki is one of the highlights of the show. Sasaki takes 90s hip-hop songs and turns them into exciting and interesting pieces of art through dance.

The concert will begin each night at 8 p.m. starting Wednesday, April 10 through Saturday, April 13 with a matinee showing at 2 p.m. Saturday. Tickets are available in Weaver 309 or by calling (859)-622-2171 between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Tickets are $5 for students, $10 for general admission and free for children under the age of 12. Reservations are still needed for children.