By Chelsea Bongiorno

Google+ is Google’s first step into social networking, putting itself up against Twitter, Myspace and of course, Facebook. When really diving into Google+, it has the best of most of the social networking perks. You can “follow” people, like on Twitter, and use it just like Facebook.

Google+ is different in many ways. The first difference you may notice is that it is an invitation-only site. Once you finally get the coveted invite, you get 150 invitations to send out to your friends and family that don’t already have one. After that, you get to embark on the “Circles.” “Circles” is how you “follow” or “friend” your friends. You put them in “Circles” labeled friends, family, acquaintances or any other group you’d like.

Another benefit, It’s free…other than time spent waiting for your personal invite to join.

In an interview with statenews.com, Nicole Ellison, an associate professor of telecommunication, information studies and media at Michigan State University, said she is not convinced that Google+ will kill Facebook.

“While Google+ is unlikely to take over Facebook’s user base completely, many students probably will use both services for a while,” Ellison said. “There is a fair amount of energy involved in a transition like that [starting a new social networking profile], and recreating a network of 600 or 700 people will take some time.”

In my opinion, Google+ is not the “Facebook Killer” it was set out to be. I think, in the future, it could be, but right now, no. It is a lot like Facebook and Twitter in a lot of different ways—too many ways. It seems to be a more mature form of Facebook, especially since it is invite-only and its users can choose who gets on the site and who does not.

You really do get the best of the social networking worlds with Google+, but it does have a striking resemblance to Facebook. If you are looking for something different and are tired of all the invites to Facebook games, you should definitely check it out. But remember, Google+ is still in its beginning stages, so it has a lot of kinks to work out.